hemptondavidDivinity School Dean David Hempton


on Lost in Translation: Polarization, Politics, and Religion in Trump’s America (Short lecture and question time)

David Hempton, Dean of the Faculty of Divinity, Alonzo L. McDonald Family Professor of Evangelical Theological Studies, John Lord O'Brian Professor of Divinity


Donald Trump won the U.S. Presidential election for many reasons: his mastery of simple narratives and the media; the vagaries of the country’s electoral system; voters’ desire for change; and the perceived weaknesses of his Democratic opponent.  He also won because Christian evangelicals—so-called ‘values voters’—voted overwhelmingly for Trump despite his apparent lack of fidelity to Christian principles. How was this possible? Join David N. Hempton, Dean of Harvard Divinity School and an award-winning historian of evangelical Christian movements, for an exploration of the ways that cultural identity, politics, and religion interacted to produce one of the most stunning electoral results in American history and what it means for the future.


Please welcome Dean Hemepton who is visiting Japan for the first time.  He will give a short talk for about 20 minutes and accept questions from the audience until 8 o’clock, followed by buffet dinner. 


Date and Time:  7 PM on March 14th (Tuesday) (Doors open at 6:30 pm)

Place:       Roppongi Hills Club

http://www.roppongihillsclub.com/visitor/dfw/rhc/jp/wedding/sp/access.html 

http://www.roppongihills.com/facilities/hills_club/

Fee:          5000 yen per person for buffet dinner.  Payable at the door.  Cash bar available.

Registration:  Please use the form below. 

For inquires, please send an email to veritas@fa.catv-yokohama.ne.jp


Please note that the dean will give a full lecture to the public on March 15th (Wednesday) at Temple University, Tokyo Campus. 


Dean Hempton's Profile:

David Hempton was appointed Dean of Harvard Divinity School in July 2012. Before joining the Faculty of Divinity in spring 2007, he was University Professor and Professor of the History of Christianity at Boston University, and prior to that appointment, he was Professor of Modern History and director of the School of History in Queen's University Belfast.


Dean Hempton is a social historian of religion with particular expertise in populist traditions of evangelicalism in Europe, North America, and beyond. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. In recent years he has delivered the F. D. Maurice Lectures at King's College London, held a fellowship of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and was HDS's outstanding teacher of the year in 2008.


He is the author of many articles and books, including Methodism and Politics in British Society, 1750-1850 (Stanford, 1984), winner of the Whitfield prize of the Royal Historical Society; Evangelical Protestantism in Ulster Society, 1740-1890 (Routledge, 1992); Religion and Political Culture in Britain and Ireland (Cambridge, 1996); The Religion of the People (Routledge, 1996); "Faith and Enlightenment," in the New Oxford History of the British Isles (Oxford, 2002); Methodism: Empire of the Spirit (Yale, 2005), winner of the Jesse Lee prize; Evangelical Disenchantment (Yale, 2008); and The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century (Tauris, 2011), winner of the American Society of Church History Outler Prize, 2012.


Dean Hempton has research and teaching interests in religion and political culture, identity and ethnic conflict, the interdisciplinary study of lived religion, comparative secularization in Europe and North America, the history and theology of Evangelical Protestantism, and the rise of global Christianity in the early modern period.


Education

BA, Queen's University (Belfast)

PhD, University of St. Andrews

When:

Tuesday, 03/14/17 at 7:00pm - 9:00pm | iCal

Where:


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